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Prenatal Testing Lenexa KS

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Prenatal Testing. You will find informative articles about Prenatal Testing, including "Getting Pregnant in Later Years" and "Prenatal Genetic Testing". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Lenexa, KS that can help answer your questions about Prenatal Testing.

Louis E Ridgway III, MD
(913) 599-1396
12200 W 106th St
Lenexa, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided By:
Larry Joe D'Angelo, MD
(602) 234-1450
4400 Broadway St Ste 409
Kansas City, MO
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med, Atlanta Ga 30322
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided By:
John Dale Yeast, MD
(816) 932-5705
4320 Wornall Rd Ste 336
Kansas City, MO
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Languages
Spanish
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mo, Columbia Sch Of Med, Columbia Mo 65212
Graduation Year: 1974
Hospital
Hospital: St Lukes Hospital, Kansas City, Mo
Group Practice: Perinatal Consultants

Data Provided By:
Richard L Meisel Jr, MD
(785) 354-5952
1500 SW 10th Ave
Topeka, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Languages
English, Spanish
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1983
Hospital
Hospital: Stormont -Vail Healthcare, Topeka, Ks
Group Practice: Maternal Fetal Medicine

Data Provided By:
James George Pullano, MD
(201) 222-6330
551 N Hillside St
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Santo Tomas, Fac Of Med And Surg, Manila, Philippines
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
Elizabeth Krin Wickstrom, MD
(330) 375-3315
4400 Wornall Rd 2nd Fl Opc
Kansas City, MO
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided By:
Gary Robert Cohen, MD
(816) 932-3585
4401 Wornall Rd Fl 2
Kansas City, MO
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Graz, Med Fak, Graz (407-27 3/1938 To 6/1945)
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
James Alan Thorp, MD
(816) 932-3585
4401 Wornall Rd Fl 2
Kansas City, MO
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
Margaret Helen O'Hara, MD
(316) 688-7990
551 N Hillside St Ste 540
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided By:
Louis E Ridgway III, MD
(913) 599-1396
12200 W 106th St
Lenexa, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Getting Pregnant in Later Years

Fortunately for most older women who have a baby, pregnancy and birth is healthy thanks to advances in modern medicine and technology. However, if you're over the age of 35, you could be at an increased risk of complications. If you already suffer from high blood pressure or heart disease, pregnancy could worsen your condition. It's also common for older women to have babies with a lower birth weight, or that are premature. Your risk of miscarriage or having a stillborn baby also increases once you reach 35.

It can even be difficult for older women to conceive. Your periods may be more irregular, and you may need to enlist the help of fertility doctors if you want to get pregnant. The most common problems in pregnancies in women over 35 are genetic abnormalities, such as Down's Syndrome. Your risk for having a baby with Down's Syndrome dramatically increases once you reach 35, and again when you reach 40 or older. Other defects such as Tay-Sachs are also more prevalent in babies born to women who are over 35.

If you do conceive after age 35, your doctor will want you to undergo prenatal testing. These tests can determine fetal complications, and are routine in older women. You will be advised to have an amniocentesis, which does carry a small risk of miscarriage. An ultrasound can often show abnormalities in as early as eight weeks, and are done more frequently if you're over 35.

It doesn't matter what ethnic group you're from women of every race are at risk ...

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Prenatal Genetic Testing

Prenatal Genetic Testing

If your baby had a serious health problem, would you want to know? Prenatal genetic testing can be a difficult subject, and parents are largely divided over this issue. Some want to know all of the possible health risks so that they can make an informed decision about the pregnancy. Others feel that it would only cause them to worry especially if an abnormality comes back but the physician is not sure how significant it is.

There are over 500 prenatal genetic tests available today to test for genetic disorders such as Huntington's disease, Downs Syndrome, spina bifida, and Tay-Sachs. Prenatal genetic testing can take a number of different forms, including blood tests, an amniocentesis (a long, thin needle is inserted through the womb and into the amniotic sac, where a small amount of the fluid is withdrawn) or chorionic villus sampling (CVS), which involves taking a cell sample from the placenta.

Usually, women over the age of 35 are advised to undergo prenatal genetic testing because the risk of the fetus having certain abnormalities increases drastically after this age. For instance, the risk of having a child with Downs Syndrome increases to one in 200 for women over age 35. Today, it is becoming more common for physicians to suggest prenatal genetic testing for women of all ages.

If a fetus is diagnosed with a genetic abnormality, parents face a tough choice. They can choose whether they wish to terminate the pregnancy, or to deal with the abnormality once the child is born. Genetic testing can't determine how extensive an abnormality is, or what symptoms will be present, so parents have no idea how serious an abnormality may be.

Diseases such as breast cancer may also be diagnosed by some types of prenatal genetic testing. Again, some parents may want to know about the health obstacles their child will face down the road, while many feel that...

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