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Infant Vaccinations Zeeland MI

Local resource for infant vaccinations in Zeeland. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to rubella vaccines, measles vaccines, mumps vaccines, and polio vaccines, as well as advice and content on infant vaccination counseling.

Baxter Wholistic Health Clinic
(616) 456-5310
935 Baxter, S.E.
Grand Rapids, MI
 
Holland Hospital
(616) 392-5141
602 Michigan Avenue
Holland, MI
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided By:
North Ottawa Community Hosp
(616) 842-3600
1309 Sheldon Road
Grand Haven, MI
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided By:
Saint Mary'S Health Care
(616) 752-6090
200 Jefferson Avenue SE
Grand Rapids, MI
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit
Hospital System
Trinity Health

Data Provided By:
Spectrum Health
(616) 774-7444
100 Michigan Street NE
Grand Rapids, MI
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit
Hospital System
Spectrum Health

Data Provided By:
Zeeland Community Hospital
(616) 772-4644
8333 Felch Street
Zeeland, MI
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided By:
Metro Health Hospital
(616) 252-7200
5900 Byron Center Ave SW
Wyoming, MI
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided By:
Spectrum Health-Spec Care Hosp
(616) 486-3000
750 Fuller Avenue NE
Grand Rapids, MI
specialty
Long-Term Acute Care
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit
Hospital System
Spectrum Health

Data Provided By:
Pine Rest Christian Health
(616) 455-5000
300 68th Street SE
Grand Rapids, MI
specialty
Psychiatric
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided By:
Mary Free Bed Rehab Hospital
(616) 242-0300
235 Wealthy Street SE
Grand Rapids, MI
specialty
Rehabilitation
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Baby Vaccines

One of the best ways to protect your child is to ensure that she gets her baby vaccines at the proper times. Baby shots are given on a set schedule, and will protect your infant from a variety of childhood diseases and conditions. The diseases that these shots prevent are extremely serious, and can even be life-threatening to infants. So, what immunizations does your baby need to stay healthy? Here is a list of the necessary baby vaccines that your baby should receive after birth.

Chicken pox: A common childhood disease, it causes itchy spots and fever. It can also lead to bacterial infections.

Diphtheria: This disease affects the throat and airway. It causes a thick coating to form, and can interfere with breathing, and cause paralysis or death.

Haemophilus Influenzae (type B): One of the most serious childhood diseases, it causes meningitis and pneumonia. Meningitis is a brain and spinal cord infection that claims babies and children suddenly, and is difficult to treat.

Hepatitis A: It causes nausea, jaundice and diarrhea. It can also cause chronic problems with the liver.

Hepatitis B: A liver disease that can cause chronic disease or liver cancer.

Influenza: Most commonly known as the flu. This is unlikely to severely harm or kill your baby, but can lead to other complications like bronchitis and pneumonia. It can be serious in very small infants. Flu symptoms include runny nose, high fever, coughs, nausea and body aches.

Measles: This causes a skin rash, as well as a fever and cough. It can be dangerous and can lead to severe illness or even death.

Mumps: Mumps can be very dangerous as it can lead to meningitis. It causes swollen glands around the jaw and testicles, headache and fever.

Pneumoccocis: Causes ear and bloodstream infections, and can lead to pneumonia and death.

Polio: A dangerous disease with various symptoms: sore throat, stomach-ache, and stiffness. It can cause paralysis, or even death in some children.

Rubella: Causes a rash to appear on the body and face. A pregnant woman can miscarry, and in babies it can cause heart disease, brain damage, blindness and deafness.

Tetanus: Tetanus causes severe muscle spasms and lockjaw in patients. It can be fatal.

Rotavirus: Causes symptoms that are similar to flu, but diarrhea can last for up to a week. There is no antibiotic that is effective against rotavirus.

You can keep your baby's shots up-to-date by taking her to your local cli...

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Tracking Vaccines

With so many infant vaccines that are necessary for your baby's health, it can be very difficult to keep track of them all. Did she get her rubella vaccine last month, or was that for hepatitis A? In some cases, there may be a shortage of vaccines in certain areas, so scheduled immunizations can be delayed. Although your baby's doctor can advise you on what shots are needed when, it's still up to you to make sure that your baby is up-to-date with her shots. Here is a basic schedule of when the required vaccines are needed:

Hepatitis B: At birth, one to two months of age, and between six and eighteen months.

Rotavirus: At two, four and six months of age.

Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis (DtaP): At two, four and six months again, and again between fifteen and eighteen months and four to six years.

Haemophilus Influenza (HIB): This immunization is given at two, four, six, twelve, and fifteen and again between eighteen months and five years of age.

Pneumococcal (PCV): Your baby will receive a PCB vaccination at two, four and six months, sometime between twelve and fifteen months, and finally between two and six years.

Polio (IPV): Given at two and four months of age, between six and eighteen months, and four to six years.

Influenza: Once each year, beginning at six months, up until age six.

Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR): At twelve to fifteen months, and two to three years.

Varicella: A varicella shot is necessary at sometime between twelve and fifteen months, and also four to six years.

Hepatitis A: This immunization comes in two doses, given when your baby is between twelve and twenty-three months.

Meningitis: Meningitis shots are given once between the ages of two and six years of age, but usually only when your infant is considered high risk.

You can easily find immunization charts from your local clinic or health care provider. A schedule can help busy moms keep track of all of the necessary vaccines that...

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