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Episiotomy Williston ND

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Beverly Jean Tong, MD
(816) 452-3300
Williston, ND
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
Beverly Jean Tong
(701) 774-7687
1213 15th Ave W
Williston, ND
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided By:
Glenn Allen Wiens, MD
(701) 572-7651
1213 15th Ave W
Williston, ND
Specialties
Family Practice, Obstetrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1986
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Hospital Of Williston, Williston, Nd
Group Practice: Craven-Hagan Clinic Ltd

Data Provided By:
Siri Johnson Fiebiger, MD
(701) 364-4535
3000 32nd Ave S
Fargo, ND
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nd Sch Of Med, Grand Forks Nd 58201
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided By:
Shari Louise Orser, MD
(701) 323-5870
PO Box 5525
Bismarck, ND
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nd Sch Of Med, Grand Forks Nd 58201
Graduation Year: 1977
Hospital
Hospital: Medcenter One Health System, Bismarck, Nd
Group Practice: Medcenter One Health Systems; Medcenter One Health Systems Jamestown Clinic; Medcenter One Health Systems Outpatient Services Center

Data Provided By:
Joseph Edward Adducci, MD
(701) 572-0316
PO Box 2438
Williston, ND
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loyola Univ Of Chicago Stritch Sch Of Med, Maywood Il 60153
Graduation Year: 1959
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Hospital Of Williston, Williston, Nd; Mc Kenzie County Mem Hospital, Watford City, Nd

Data Provided By:
Sara Solberg
(701) 774-7687
1213 15th Ave W
Williston, ND
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided By:
Dr.Joseph Adducci
(701) 572-0316
1213 15th Avenue West
Williston, ND
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Loyola Univ Of Chicago Stritch Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1959
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Hospital: Mercy Hospital Of Williston, Williston, Nd
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.0, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided By:
David A Billings
(701) 857-7394
400 Burdick Expy E
Minot, ND
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided By:
Kathleen M Perkerewicz
(701) 323-6543
414 N 7th St
Bismarck, ND
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Episiotomy

Episiotomy

An episiotomy is a surgical procedure that enlarges the vaginal opening during labor by cutting the perineum, the skin and muscles between the vulva and anus.

Episiotomy is the surgery most commonly performed on women in the United States.

Between 50 and 90% of women giving birth to their first child undergo this procedure. For decades, episiotomies have been performed on a routine basis to help speed delivery during the second stage of labor; as well as to prevent tears to the mother's vagina, especially serious tears that may stretch to the anus. The procedure was also thought to lessen trauma to the baby and protect the mother's vaginal muscles.

Episiotomies May Be Useful Under The Following Conditions:

  • Labor is too fast. If you are unable to stop pushing and slow your labor, some health care providers believe a clean cut may help prevent a serious tear.
  • Fetal or maternal distress. An episiotomy may speed delivery if you or your baby are experiencing complications.
  • Extremely large or breech baby. An episiotomy may help ensure a safe delivery by widening the vaginal opening.

Currently, there is disagreement in the medical field about the routine performance of an episiotomy. One large study showed that routinely cutting an episiotomy increases the risk of tears in the back of the vagina, but reduces tears in the front. Based on these results, the World Health Organization, among other groups, recommends avoiding episiotomy unless it's absolutely necessary.

What Will Happen?

If an episiotomy is needed, then just before your baby is born, as the head is about to crown, your care health provider will inject a local anesthetic in the bottom of your vaginal opening and make an incision.

There are two types of incisions: median and medio-lateral. The median incision goes straight down the vagina toward the anus; the medio-lateral incision is made at an angle from the vagina to the anus. The medio-lateral is considered less likely to tear through to the anus, but is more difficult to repair and takes longer to heal than the median.

Your health care provider will then deliver the baby through the enlarged opening, followed by the placenta. The incision is stitched closed immediately after delivery.

For most women healing is uncomplicated, although it may take several weeks. You can help speed the process by asking nurses to apply ice packs immediately following the birth.

To Continue The Healing Process Over The Next Few Weeks You Should:

  • Use sitz bath a few times a day, change your pads frequently, and try a heat lamp or hair dryer after you bathe to keep the area around the stitches clean and dry.
  • Take stool softeners and eat lots of fiber to prevent constipation.
  • Perform Kegel exercises. Squeeze the muscles that you use to hold in urine for five minutes, 10 times a day, during your regular activities...

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