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Breastfeeding Information Fort Dodge IA

Looking for Breastfeeding Information in Fort Dodge? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around Fort Dodge that should help you with your search. We hope this page helps you find Breastfeeding Information in Fort Dodge.

Kristie Neddermeyer, RN, BSN, LCCE
(515) 832-7770
2102 Rodlyn Rd
Webster City, IA

Data Provided By:
Ilene Rae Olson, MD
(515) 574-6870
804 Kenyon Rd Ste 220
Fort Dodge, IA
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1988
Hospital
Hospital: Trinity Reg Hosp, Fort Dodge, Ia
Group Practice: Trimark Physicians Group

Data Provided By:
Herman M Tan, MD
(515) 576-6699
1154 Colonial Dr
Fort Dodge, IA
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Malaya, Fac Perubatan, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided By:
Brian L Welch
(515) 574-6870
804 Kenyon Rd
Fort Dodge, IA
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided By:
Dr.Ilene Olson
(515) 574-6870
804 Kenyon Rd # 220
Fort Dodge, IA
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd
Year of Graduation: 1988
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Hospital: Trinity Reg Hosp, Fort Dodge, Ia
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.2, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided By:
J Guthrie McCarroll, MD FACS
915 7th Ave N
Fort Dodge, IA
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Queen''s
Graduation Year: 1939

Data Provided By:
Dr.Brian Welch
(515) 574-6870
804 Kenyon Rd # 220
Fort Dodge, IA
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1983
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Robert T OConnor
(515) 574-6870
804 Kenyon Rd
Fort Dodge, IA
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided By:
Ilene R Olson
(515) 574-6870
804 Kenyon Rd
Fort Dodge, IA
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided By:
Brian L. Welch
(515) 574-6870
Trimark Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fort Dodge, IA
Specialty
Infertility,
Education
English
Professional Memberships
Trinity Regional Hospital

Data Provided By:

Breastfeeding Myths

Breastfeeding Myths

 
Very often women are giving incorrect information about breastfeeding, which makes them scared to try and breastfeed or makes them believe incorrect information about breastfeeding. Here you will find several common breastfeeding myths, to answer any questions you may have about breastfeeding! 
 
 
Many women do not produce enough milk. 
 
Not true!
 
The vast majority of women produce more than enough milk. Indeed, an overabundance of milk is common. Most babies that gain too slowly, or lose weight, do so not because the mother does not have enough milk, but because the baby does not get the milk that the mother has. The usual reason that the baby does not get the milk that is available is that he is poorly latched onto the breast. This is why it is so important that the mother be shown, on the first day, how to latch a baby on properly, by someone who knows what they are doing.
 
 
It is normal for breastfeeding to hurt.
 
Not true!
 
Though some tenderness during the first few days is relatively common, this should be a temporary situation that lasts only a few days and should never be so bad that the mother dreads nursing. Any pain that is more than mild is abnormal and is almost always due to the baby Starting Out Right poorly. Any nipple pain that is not getting better by day 3 or 4 or lasts beyond 5 or 6 days should not be ignored. A new onset of pain when things have been going well for a while may be due to a yeast infection of the nipples. Limiting feeding time does not prevent soreness.
 
 
There is no (not enough) milk during the first 3 or 4 days after birth.

Not true!

It often seems like that because the baby is not latched on properly and therefore is unable to get the milk that is available. When there is not a lot of milk (as there is not, normally, in the first few days), the baby must be well latched on in order to get the milk. This accounts for "but he's been on the breast for 2 hours and is still hungry when I take him off". By not Starting Out Right well, the baby is unable to get the mother's first milk, called colostrum. Anyone who suggests you pump your milk to know how much colostrum there is, does not understand breastfeeding, and should be politely ignored. Once the mother's milk is abundant, a baby can latch on poorly and still may get plenty of milk.
 
 
A baby should be on the breast 20 (10, 15, 7.6) minutes on each side.
 
Not true! 
 
However, a distinction needs to be made between "being on the breast" and "breastfeeding". If a baby is actually drinking for most of 15-20 minutes on the first side, he may not want to take the second side at all. If he drinks only a minute on the first side, and then nibbles or sleeps, and does the same on the other, no amount of time will be enough. The ...

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